Turnip Seeds

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  1. White Egg Turnip - Packet

    Sow seeds in the spring and wait less than 45 days for the small round white roots of White Egg Turnip to be ready to harvest. Shave onto a salad, slice and steam with herb butter, o...

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    White Egg Turnip - Packet Brassica rapa
    $2.50
    Per Packet
    Sow seeds in the spring and wait less than 45 days for the small round white roots of White Egg Turnip to be ready to harvest. Shave onto a salad, slice and steam with herb butter, or blend into a creamy soup with spring onions. The turnip, once held in great esteem, deserves a place at the table once again and luckily, White Egg is here to stay.
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  2. Seven Top Turnip - Packet

    Seven Top is on the Slow Food Ark of Taste list of endangered varieties, because it is primarily grown for the sumptuous green tops and not the root. Once a garden fixture in the so...

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    Seven Top Turnip - Packet Brassica rapa
    $2.50
    Per Packet
    Seven Top is on the Slow Food Ark of Taste list of endangered varieties, because it is primarily grown for the sumptuous green tops and not the root. Once a garden fixture in the south, the seed has become hard to find. The cherished “turnip salad” starts with peppery hot Turnip leaves, which are tamed with a dressing of hot bacon grease and a dash of salt. Seven Top is best grown in the fall, leaves picked small for salads and larger for sautéed cooked greens.
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  3. Purple Top White Globe Turnip - Packet

    Remind yourself that turnips were once the most popular vegetable to grow in a garden, then sow a row of Purple White Globe to find out why. Harking back to Landreth’s earliest ro...

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    Purple Top White Globe Turnip - Packet Brassica rapa
    $2.50
    Per Packet
    Remind yourself that turnips were once the most popular vegetable to grow in a garden, then sow a row of Purple White Globe to find out why. Harking back to Landreth’s earliest roots, these cold hardy turnips were prized in the 1880’s. Ready to hold up to a cold winter in the root cellar or left in the ground to sweeten up during a mild winter. Bring this heirloom back to your garden, pick it small when tender enough to add to soups, salads or simply steamed with butter.
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